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Showing posts from August 12, 2018

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Forget the S-500 or Su-57 PAK-FA. Russia's Military Has Big Plans for the Future.

Russia has started planning for the development of a series of next-generation weapons to follow-on to systems such as the Sukhoi Su-57 PAK-FA and the S-500 surface-to-air missile (SAM) battery. These new systems—which the Russian government has not named—will be developed under future advanced State Armament Program.



“An important and key issue on our agenda is to define the beginning of the creation of yet another advanced state armament program,” Russian President Vladimir Putin said during a meeting of the Kremlin’s Military Industrial Commission . Putin said that Russia has to start planning for its future defense needs now as it completes developmental programs that were funded under the current State Armament Plan (GPV-2027). “It is important for us to move further and start planning today the future development and production of advanced weapons and equipment that will define the image of the Russian Armed Forces in the long-term, for the next few decades,” Putin said. Putin …

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Artificial intelligence beyond the superpowers

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Much of the debate over how artificial intelligence (AI) will affect geopolitics focuses on the emerging arms race between Washington and Beijing, as well as investments by major military powers like Russia. And to be sure, breakthroughs are happening at a rapid pace in the United States and China. But while an arms race between superpowers is riveting, AI development outside of the major powers, even where advances are less pronounced, could also have a profound impact on our world. The way smaller countries choose to use and invest in AI will affect their own power and status in the international system. Middle powers—countries like Australia, France, Singapore, and South Korea—are generally prosperous and technologically advanced, with small-to-medium-sized populations. In the language of economics, they usually possess more capital than labor. Their domestic investments in AI have the potential to, at a minimum, enhance their economic positions as global demand grows for technolo…
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Russian airbase in Syria destroys 45 drones over past month: ministry

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Haber görseline özellikle dikkat. Ahşap gövdeli İHA. Asimetrik ve dolayısıyla modern tanımıyla Hibrit savaşın gerekleri tek tek gerçekleşiyor. Daha önce çelik levhalar kaynaklanmış kamyonların ileri teknoloji toplara karşı nasıl etkinlik sağladığını hatırlayalım. Yakın zamanda meskun mahallerde sapan tarzı silahlarla yüksek teknolojili mühimmat atıldığını da göreceğiz.


Russian soldiers display the remains of, what they said was, a drone belonging to rebel fighters and was shot down over the base in the Russian air base in Hmeimim in the northwestern Syrian province of Latakia on August 16, 2018. (AFP PHOTO) MOSCOW, Aug. 16 (Xinhua) -- Russia's Hmeimim airbase in Syria has intercepted a total of 45 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in the last month, the Russian Defense Ministry said Thursday.
"Over the past month, 45 UAVs equipped with improvised explosive devices were destroyed by the base's air defense or (by) means of radio-electronic warfare systems. Five drones were sho…
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DARPA Wants to Make Underground Maps on the Fly

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NOMAD_SOUL/SHUTTERSTOCK.COM AA Font size + Print Finding your way through caves and tunnels is both difficult and extremely dangerous, but the Pentagon’s research office wants to build technology that can navigate underground environments while humans stay on the surface.
The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is finalizing teams for its Subterranean Challenge, or SubT, a three-year competition to build systems that can rapidly map and search often treacherous underground areas.
The agency on Thursday awarded a $4.5 million contract to Virginia-based iRobot Defense Holdings and a $750,000 contract to Michigan Technological University to participate in the challenge. A third team, Scientific Systems Company Inc., joined the program on July 31 with a $492,000 contract.
“Even under ideal conditions, these complex environments present significant challenges for subterranean situational awareness,” DARPAwrote in the program announcement. “However, in time-sensitive scenarios, whether i…
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Russia Has Four Potential "Killer Satellites" In Orbit, At Least That We Know About

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Now it’s important to note that the concept of a small inspector satellite isn’t new and makes good sense. Sending manned missions to examine satellites and other space objects and potentially make repairs or modifications has historically been costly and complicated. At the same time, fixing or making modifications to a satellite in space saves the trouble of building a replacement and paying to launch it into orbit. Famously, the United States sent astronauts to fix theHubble Space Telescopein 1993 after NASA discovered a fault in the system’s main mirror. Having a semi-autonomous,space-based repair crewof sorts on call could simply the arrangement significantly. If nothing else, these robotic inspectors could assess the issue quickly so personnel on the ground could make an informed decision about how to proceed. The problem is that any satellite that can maneuver itself very close to another one, and may have small arms or probes to physically interact with its target, is inherently …
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Russia's S-500: How Putin Could Kill Air Force F-22s and B-2 Stealth Bombers?

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Russia’s fearsome new S-500 air and missile defense system has apparently entered production—and is setting new records for missile engagement range. Given the S-500’s advanced networking capabilities, some military analysts have suggested that the Russians might genuinely be able to engage stealth aircraft. Indeed, by networking multiple high-speed long wave radars such as the RLS Voronezh-DM and 1L119 Nebo SVU, it might be possible to generate a weapons quality track on an aircraft such as the F-22 or F-35. Sensor fusion has afforded militaries many capabilities that are greater than the sum of their part. This many be one such case. Russia’s fearsome new S-500 air and missile defense system has apparently entered production—and is setting new records for missile engagement range. (This first appeared last month.) The next generation weapon is designed to supplement Moscow’s already potent S-400 and replace the A-135 anti-ballistic missile system. Not only does the weapon have unprecede…
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Army Tests Jamming MRAPs: New Electronic Warfare Vehicle

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Army Electronic Warfare Tactical VehiclePhoto by: EWTV This fall, Army Forces Command will get “several” armored trucks packed with radio jamming gear to test new tactics and, if necessary, deploy overseas in a crisis. While the Army put out a press release Aug. 2, and officials answered some of my follow-up questions, they were understandably unwilling to detail the capabilities or even the exact number of the Electronic Warfare Tactical Vehicles (EWTVs). What is clear, though, is that the EWTVs are a small but significant step towards rebuilding the Army’s disbanded capability to attack enemy communications, the electronic linchpin of modern warfare. The Army’s high-priority Rapid Equipping Force (REF) coordinates the effort with Army Cyber Command (ARCYBER), Army Test & Evaluation Command (ATEC), Training & Doctrine Command (TRADOC) capability managers (who write official requirements), and multiple program offices. (The EWTV effort precedes the Army’s creation of Cross-Fu…
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Unmanned cargo aircraft for military supplies

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U.S. Army military logistics experts are reaching out to industry to find companies able to prototype an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) cargo aircraft able to transport as much as 600 pounds of military supplies like ammunition, water, and food to forward-deployed warfighters engaged on the battlefield.
Officials of the Army Contracting Command in Warren, Mich., announced plans Wednesday to issue a request for prototype proposals (UASRPP18-10) for a medium-size UAV able to move supplies quickly to and from the battlefield.
The Army Contracting Command is issuing this request for prototypes on behalf of the Army Armament Research Development, and Engineering Center (ARDEC) headquartered at Picatinny Arsenal, N.J.
Army experts want a UAV prototype able to carry a payload of between 50 and 600 pounds of supplies while maintaining a gross take off vehicle weight of less than 1320 pounds. This project is part of the Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) program of record under the Ground …
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Drone Swarms as You Know Them Are Just an Illusion—for Now

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Liam CobbPhoto by: Liam Cobb Look at all the pretty drones. Hovering above sports stadiums from Houston to Pyeongchang, many hundreds of them have lately sparkled in artful murmuration. On a recentTime magazine cover, 958 drones pixelated the sky. The world record, 1,374 LED-bedazzled microbots, was set by Chinese company EHang UAV in May. So-called drone swarms—the phrase people have taken up with gusto—are having their biggest, buzziest year ever. It’s an evocative word,swarms, and innocuous enough when applied to one ofIntel’s drone light shows. But it’s tinged with alarm—if drones can dance at twilight, they can also attack. Sure enough, a gang outside Denver sent a small fleet to harass FBI agents on a raid earlier this year. In Syria, rebels reportedly sicced a squadron of quadrotors on a Russian base. To the media, both events were swarms. Take comfort, then, in this buzzkill: “The swarm is really an illusion,” says Mac Schwager, an assistant professor at Stanford who studies mul…
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Lockheed ‘Seizes High Ground’ With Second Hypersonics Deal

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WASHINGTON: It’s not over until it’s over,, but Lockheed Martin is certainly showing early promise in the eye-wateringly difficult technical field of building a useful hypersonic weapon.
The Air Force announced last night that it was awarding the world’s biggest defense company a $480 million contract to develop a prototype for the Air-Launched Rapid Response Weapon (ARRW). Mike Griffin talks hypersonics in Huntsville. Lockheed “has been putting a lot of work into this and a great deal of emphasis in terms of company strategy,” said Richard Aboulafia, the dean of aviation analysis over at Teal Group. “But as our British pals say, it’s early days in this industry. The technology is far from mature. A lot can happen before deployable systems see more than limited production runs. But right now, yes, they are seizing the high ground in hypersonics.” Hypersonics is the top priority for Michael Griffin, head of Pentagon research and development. Why? Because, while the US led the way in ba…
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As China's military masters artificial intelligence, why are we still building aircraft carriers?

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Will the Pentagon, with its 30-year planning cycle for building ships, still be launching aircraft carriers in 2048 -- even though they're highly vulnerable to attack today? Real Clear Politics reports. Continue reading original article
That's an example of the military-modernization questions that kept nagging participants at the gathering earlier this month of the Aspen Strategy Group, which annually brings together top-level current and former national-security officials, along with a few journalists, to discuss defense and foreign policy.
This year's focus was on "Maintaining America's Edge" in the dawning era of high-tech combat, and the big takeaway was this: The future of warfare is now, and China is poised to dominate it. "It is not that we lack money. It is that we are playing a losing game," said Christian Brose, staff director of the Senate Armed Services Committee, in a paper presented to the group. "Our competitors are now using adva…
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