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Drone Swarms as You Know Them Are Just an Illusion—for Now

Liam CobbPhoto by: Liam Cobb Look at all the pretty drones. Hovering above sports stadiums from Houston to Pyeongchang, many hundreds of them have lately sparkled in artful murmuration. On a recentTime magazine cover, 958 drones pixelated the sky. The world record, 1,374 LED-bedazzled microbots, was set by Chinese company EHang UAV in May. So-called drone swarms—the phrase people have taken up with gusto—are having their biggest, buzziest year ever. It’s an evocative word,swarms, and innocuous enough when applied to one ofIntel’s drone light shows. But it’s tinged with alarm—if drones can dance at twilight, they can also attack. Sure enough, a gang outside Denver sent a small fleet to harass FBI agents on a raid earlier this year. In Syria, rebels reportedly sicced a squadron of quadrotors on a Russian base. To the media, both events were swarms. Take comfort, then, in this buzzkill: “The swarm is really an illusion,” says Mac Schwager, an assistant professor at Stanford who studies mul…

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Naval aviation engineer developing artificial intelligence system for radar data

The Military & Aerospace Electronics take:
The artificial intelligence system for radar is an outgrowth of Ph.D. research into pulsars and mysterious cosmic signals called fast radio bursts conducted by the Atlantic Test Range's (ATR) electrical engineer Stephen Itschner.
“I’m hoping it will help us automate a process that’s now very time consuming because we have to do it all by hand,” says Itschner, who works with ATR’s Advanced Dynamic Aircraft Measurement System (ADAMS) group.
If successful, Itschner’s system will be integrated into ADAMS, which provides radar cross-section data from aircraft during flight tests. Radar signals bouncing back from an aircraft can be contaminated with external Radio Frequency Interference or RFI, he says.
militaryaerospace.com
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