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Forget the S-500 or Su-57 PAK-FA. Russia's Military Has Big Plans for the Future.

Russia has started planning for the development of a series of next-generation weapons to follow-on to systems such as the Sukhoi Su-57 PAK-FA and the S-500 surface-to-air missile (SAM) battery. These new systems—which the Russian government has not named—will be developed under future advanced State Armament Program.



“An important and key issue on our agenda is to define the beginning of the creation of yet another advanced state armament program,” Russian President Vladimir Putin said during a meeting of the Kremlin’s Military Industrial Commission . Putin said that Russia has to start planning for its future defense needs now as it completes developmental programs that were funded under the current State Armament Plan (GPV-2027). “It is important for us to move further and start planning today the future development and production of advanced weapons and equipment that will define the image of the Russian Armed Forces in the long-term, for the next few decades,” Putin said. Putin …

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‘Underground’ May Be the U.S. Military’s Next Warfighting Domain

U.S. Army AA Font size + Print U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Clarence C. Elicio examines a tunnel at Qala-I-Jangi in northern Afghanistan's Balkh province, Sept. 30, 2013.
The U.S. military is considering adding a new warfighting domain to U.S. military doctrine: the underground realm, said the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency.
“Subterranean is something we are going to have to contend with in the future. You look at the electrical systems…control systems, control grids,” Lt. Gen. Robert Ashley said Tuesday at the Defense One Technology Summit in Washington, D.C.
The underground sphere is particularly important in cities, where nearly two-thirds of the world’s population will live by 2040 — and where the Pentagon expects to see more combat.
The domains currently include land, sea, air, space, and cyber — the latter added in 2012. Adding another would reshape spending and strategy.
Whether or not the underground realm is ultimately anointed as a new domain, there is a new seriousness about it. Last year, the U.S. Army accelerated its push to outfit 26 of its 31 active combat brigades with new tools and training to “fight in large-scale subterranean facilities that exist beneath dense urban areas around the world,” Military.com reported. In December, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPAlaunched a new Grand Challenge to develop new technologies for underground warfare and intelligence gathering, in order to “rapidly map, navigate, and search underground environments,” with a final event planned for 2021.
defenseone.com
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