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What’s going on with America’s next fighter designs?

WASHINGTON ― America is developing a pair of two new high-tech fighter aircraft, and you probably haven’t heard much about them. Under the leadership of Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, the Pentagon has clamped down on talking about cutting-edge capabilities in development, citing concerns about giving potential foes too much information. Nevertheless, some details have emerged about the ongoing programs, one each from the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Navy. And inlight of European plans for new fighter designs, it is worth revisiting what is, and isn’t, known about the American efforts. In 2016, the U.S. Air Force unveiled its “Air Superiority 2030” study, which posited that although the service would need a new air superiority fighter jet — called Penetrating Counter Air — as soon as the 2030s, it would be just as important that the new plane fit into a "family of systems” of space,cyber, electronic warfareand other enabling technologies. “When you look at — through the lens of the netw…

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Russia to develop advanced radio-photonic radars for 6th-generation fighter jets

MOSCOW, July 9. /TASS/. Radio-photonic radars for unmanned aerial vehicles and aircraft will be created in Russia in several years to get an accurate target image, the press office of RTI Group told TASS on Monday.
As was reported earlier, radio-photonic radars are expected to be mounted on Russian sixth-generation fighter jets. This station sees considerably further than a conventional radar and will be capable of building actually a photographic image of the target that will be identified automatically.
As the press office said, RTI Group is completing R&D work in 2018 on creating a mockup of the X-band radio-photonic radar. Following its results, specialists "will determine a principal scheme of building the radio-photonic locator," which will make it possible "in several years to build prototypes of super-light and small-size radars for unmanned aerial vehicles."
Such radars "will be able to provide radio wave imaging when an image has greater details with the possibility to identify the target type," the RTI Group press office said.
Such radars will have a considerably smaller weight and size and consume less power both on drones and aircraft.
TASS
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